Mount Agung

Mount Agung
Mount Agung is a mountain in Bali. This Stratovolcano is the highest point on the Bali island (3.142 mdpl). It dominates the surrounding area influencing the climate. The clouds come from the west and Mt.Agung takes their water so that the west is lush and green and the east dry and barren. Gunung Agung last erupted in 1963-64 and is still active, with a large and very deep crater which occasionally belches smoke and ash. From a distance, the mountain appears to be perfectly conical, despite the existence of the large crater. From the peak of the mountain, it is possible to see the peak of Gunung Rinjani on the island of Lombok, although both mountains are frequently covered in cloud.

The 1963-1964 Eruption

Temple Of Besakih

Temple Of Besakih

Temple Of Besakih

Temple Of Besakih


The lava flows missed, sometimes by mere yards, the Mother Temple of Besakih The saving of the temple is regarded by the Balinese people as miraculous and a signal from the gods that they wished to demonstrate their power but not destroy the monument the Balinese faithful had erected. However, over 1,000 people were killed and a number of villages were destroyed in this eruption.
There are two routes up the mountain, one from Besakih which proceeds to a higher peak and starts at approximately 1100metres and another which commences higher from Pura Pasar Agung, on the southern slope of the mountain, near Selat and which is reputed to take 4 hours.

From Pura Pasar Agung

The mountain can be seen from various directions in video, there is a well produced video of the climb from Pura Pasar Agung and a short video from the top above Besakih. Greg Slay den describes a climb from Besakih claimed to have taken a remarkable four and a half hours to the peak and Ken Taylor describes a climb that took much longer and which included getting lost.